Matthews, Clive

This edition is from our archives, so it is presented as scanned pages rather than text. You may need to scroll to find the article you’re looking for.

Read more »

Did Einstein play the pipes? (Humour) Mar 2013 in Chanter 2013 Spring

This edition is from our archives, so it is presented as scanned pages rather than text. You may need to scroll to find the article you’re looking for.

Read more »

Court cases involving pipers Sep 2012 in Chanter 2012 Autumn

This edition is from our archives, so it is presented as scanned pages rather than text. You may need to scroll to find the article you’re looking for.

Read more »

carvings and inaccuracies Sep 2012 in Chanter 2012 Autumn

This edition is from our archives, so it is presented as scanned pages rather than text. You may need to scroll to find the article you’re looking for.

Read more »

David Hatton's Flutorum Jun 2012 in Chanter 2012 Summer

This edition is from our archives, so it is presented as scanned pages rather than text. You may need to scroll to find the article you’re looking for.

Read more »

Bagpipes, spiders and the History of Psychology Mar 2012 in Chanter 2012 Spring

This edition is from our archives, so it is presented as scanned pages rather than text. You may need to scroll to find the article you’re looking for.

Read more »

Invasion of the Zampognari Dec 2011 in Chanter 2011 Winter

In the Autumn 2010 issue of Chanter Julian Goodacre drew our attention to a couple of previously unspotted entries in the nineteenth century diary of the Reverend Francis Kilvert describing Italian bagpipers turning up in his parish near Hay-on-Wye in the Welsh Marches: in July 1872 he writes of a “wild swarthy Italian-looking man, young, with a steeple-crowned hat, and full of uncouth cries and strange outland words” (Plomer, 1938: 375) playing his pipes to the delight of a group of dancing children, whilst on Midsummer’s day the following year he records hearing the “drone of the Italian bagpipes advancing” before “two men … came playing through the village” (Plomer, 1939: 217).

Read more »

Bagpipers in the Dock* Jun 2011 in Chanter 2011 Summer

Easy access to a variety of large online historical databases allied to simple keyword search facilities is beginning to revolutionise our understanding of the musical past. A particularly splendid example of the results that can be achieved using these resources is David Lasocki’s exhaustive work on early flute makers identified mainly through eighteenth century classified newspaper advertisements (Lasocki, 2010). Similarly, a recent article in The Strad records the previously unknown criminal history of Lockey Hill, a member of the famous English violin making family, gleaned from the online proceedings of the Old Bailey (Nex, 2010).

Read more »

My wife recently drew my attention to an article in The Guardian (8th November, 2010, G2 section) with the intriguing title “Shocking news from Oxford: You can’t play a flute with your bottom”. The story reported on how “a team of musicologists, craftsmen and academics” from the Bate Collection of Musical Instruments in Oxford had attempted to make “exact replicas” of the instruments depicted in the right-hand panel of Hieronymus Bosch’s famous triptych The Garden of Earthly Delights (c.

Read more »

Billy Purvis, Union Piper Dec 2010 in Chanter 2010 Winter

Without wanting to enter into the discussion of the Irishness of the Union pipes raised by David Ward (Chanter Winter 2005), I would like to correct a small mistake in Dirk Campbell’s response to him (Chanter, Spring 2006). The source of the mistake, however, does not appear to lie with Dirk but with the generally outstanding Folk Archive Resource North East (FARNE) website. His article is illustrated with the splendid engraving from the FARNE archive of William (Billy) Purvis (1784-1853) playing the Union pipes.

Read more »

Some readers may be familiar with the following image. It appears, for example, in George Charlton’s The Northumbrian Bag-Pipes (1930) where he describes it inconsistently as from both “an early eighteenth century broadside” (p. 140) and “a political squib from the [nineteenth century which] shows the Duke of Northumberland’s piper” (p. 141)1. That the piper is meant to be associated with the Duke is clearly indicated by the Percy crescent on his forearm; the same crescent which is seen in depictions of the notorious Northumbrian gypsy piper James Allan (1734-1810).

Read more »

Stiltwalking Bagpipers Dec 2010 in Chanter 2010 Winter

I’m not sure where I found the following image but thought readers might be interested in it. I am pretty certain it is a Belgian trade card (for starch) dating around 1890. Depicted is a bagpiping shepherd from the Landes region of Gascony; although why he should be associated with selling starch is unclear. Presumably the pipes are meant to represent a boha, the traditional cornemuse landaise. Today the Landes largely consists of

Read more »

Abraham Bloemaert’s (1566-1651) The Bagpipe Player (Fig. 1) (now in the Residenzgalerie, Salzburg) was painted in Utrecht somewhere between 1625 and 1630 (Roethlisberger, 1993: 267). As one of the most arresting images of a piper and his pipes, it is not surprising that it has been subjected to a good deal of attention in the bagpipe literature. Askew (1931) and Cheape (1994), for example, have particularly emphasised its influence on later representations of bagpipes, an influence which can be felt over more than a couple of centuries; this is a subject to which I intend to return in a later paper.

Read more »

bagpipes in satire Jun 2010 in Chanter 2010 Summer

This edition is from our archives, so it is presented as scanned pages rather than text. You may need to scroll to find the article you’re looking for.

Read more »

Jiff's 101 Alternative uses for Drones: No 47 Dec 2009 in Chanter 2009 Winter

This edition is from our archives, so it is presented as scanned pages rather than text. You may need to scroll to find the article you’re looking for.

Read more »

On Brugghen's piper painting Dec 2009 in Chanter 2009 Winter

This edition is from our archives, so it is presented as scanned pages rather than text. You may need to scroll to find the article you’re looking for.

Read more »

We are settling into our new website, including making available articles from our thirty year history. If you spot something inaccurate, garbled or missing, or if you want to volunteer to help us improve our site, please mail info@bagpipesociety.

Website by Joe Wass, managed by Ian Clabburn.

Website content by Andy Letcher.

All articles copyright their respective authors.

Enquiries to info@bagpipesociety.org.uk

Membership enquiries to membership@bagpipesociety.org.uk